hemp oil in the kitchen

A few weeks (maybe months) ago, I vowed to oil some of my well used kitchen utensils with hemp oil.  Well. I finally did and shared the before and after over on Miss Mustard Seed’s Milk Paint blog.

I am thrilled with the results!  Go check out the details.

hemp oil in the kitchen

Even if you’re not into paint, hemp oil is a very handy tool to have around the house.  If you are interested in trying it, I have it available for sale online and in the shop.

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the best seat in the house

This is one of my very favorite spaces in our home.

Reading Nook

It is a built-in cedar bench with much-needed storage.  I love built-ins of any kind because they are just so custom to each house. We left built-in shelves behind in our previous dining room and living room.  The only thing better than built-ins might be pocket doors.

Reading Nook

This is a special place where we like to curl up and read a book when time allows. In the winter, the baseboard heat pumps right up onto the seat making it even cozier.  Said baseboard is due for a coat of glossy white paint this spring.

Reading Nook

Over the holidays we added top down/bottom up shades. I was really committed to the idea of these shades so that we could always have the top down yielding a perfectly clear view. Our bed faces the window so it is spectacular to wake up to the sun peeking through the woods. We see the most beautiful early morning pink skies and evening lavender clouds.

And lately we’ve been waking up to snow dusting our holly trees.  It’s the little things.

Reading Nook

The valance is just a strand of starfish because we are “down the shore” after all and sometimes a little kitsch is necessary.  The salvaged piece above the window was a Brimfield honeymoon find.  I love all of the vivid colors.

Reading Nook (5 of 13)

Remember our garden rake belt hook?  Well, there it is.

  Reading Nook (3 of 13)

  That’s it.  The best seat in the house.

Reading Nook

Check out the rest of the salvage style room here.

winter market

Clover’s Winter Market on Sunday was a blast! As usual. The market always draws a fun crowd.  Now I am dreaming of spring when the outdoor markets return!

Save the dates for Spring Clover Market:

  • April 13- Chestnut Hill
  • April 27- Ardmore
  • May 18- Ardmore
  • June 8- Chestnut Hill

As for the Winter Market, I saw a lot of familiar faces and met a handful of new folks as well.  Plus, the 23rd Street Armory is such an interesting venue right in the heart of Philadelphia.

clover armory

I was thrilled to participate as a DIY workshop instructor. I brought a stash of Miss Mustard Seed’s milk paint and led an Introduction to Milk Paint workshop.

#mmsmilkpaint workshop @ Clover Market

We had a great time painting these adorable frames and talking about the fundamentals of what makes milk paint unique.

#mmsmilkpaint workshop

If you want to be notified of any future workshops like these, be sure to comment on this post and I will add your email address to my workshop list.  And if you can’t make it out to pick up some milk paint for your project (hello, winter storm alert!), you can always order online right here.  We’re expecting a big stash this week to replenish the inventory!

So, did you make it to Clover Market on Sunday…or shopping locally where you are?  If so, what treasures did you score?

milk paint workshop at Clover Market

How much do I love Clover Market?

Clover Market

I can never stay away.

Although Circa Dee will not be present as a vendor at the Winter Market on January 19th, I am excited to tell you that yours truly will be there leading a DIY workshop.

Yep, Miss Mustard Seed’s Milk Paint at Clover Market!  You’ve asked for it!

Clover

Clover Market hosts just one Winter Market a year.  It is located in Philadelphia at the 23rd Street Armory.  The Winter Market packs in all of the vintage and handmade goodness that the outdoor markets are known for; plus a ton of other perks including early bird admission, tasty food trucks and DIY workshops.

All of the FAQs can be found on Clover Market’s website.

But I can answer a few regarding the DIY workshop that I’ll be hosting….

milk paint

Introduction to Milk Paint

Sunday, January 19th – 2:30-3:30 pm

You’ll learn what makes Miss Mustard Seed’s Milk Paint paint unique and how to properly mix it and apply it  Experiment on sample boards before you complete your own finished picture frame (your choice of paint color and top coat) and leave with the know-how to tackle larger DIY projects at home – plus a cheat sheet in case you forget!  Fee includes all materials and instruction.  Just $25

If you’ve been to one of my free hands-off demos but you still haven’t taken the plunge, this just might be the push you need to do-it-yourself!  Or perhaps you have been DIYing with milk paint but want to spend an afternoon crafting and shopping with some friends…bring them!  Purchase tickets here and check out the other great DIY workshops planned.  There will also be a limited amount of milk paint products available for sale.

Hope to see you at Clover Market!

P.S. More details about milk paint hands-off demos and hands-on workshops can be found here.

wine cork ornament DIY

Tell me you don’t have a big ol’ pile of wine corks somewhere.

In a drawer.  In a vase.  In your liquor cabinet.

If you are just a little bit crafty (and like wine), you’ve most likely stashed some corks like I did, right?  Just waiting for some trash-to-treasure project inspiration.  Well, here it is friends!

wine cork tree ornament diy

Start by gathering these supplies…

cork tree ornament supplies

For the corks, be sure to use the porous ones – actual corks.  The waxy ones just don’t adhere well.

I played around with a few different layouts before I got started.  I found that the bulky champagne corks made great “tree trunks”.  Plus they tend to be more decorative on top.

wine cork tree ornament

  • First, drill a hole perpendicular through the center of the cork so you can loop your twine through.  I used 6 inch pieces of twine for the ornament hanger.cork tree ornament
  • This is totally optional but if you’d like to attach a name tag, now is the time.  Punch (or cut) a circle out of card stock.  Use the hole punch to create a small hole and loop the twine through before knotting it.  This step allows you to double the ornament as a name tag on a wrapped gift!wine cork tree ornament
  • Now let’s assemble.  Glue a horizontal line each cork and attach one at a time.  Make sure to use your ornament hanger as the top cork.wine cork tree ornament

That’s it!wine cork tree ornament

These ornaments are fun and easy to make but the best part is acquiring enough corks.

wine cork tree ornament DIY

Because you probably already have all of the other necessary materials.

wine cork tree ornament supplies

trimming the tree with citrus

The phrase “trimming the tree” took on a whole new meaning for us this year.

Citrus Garland on the Christmas Tree

We picked out a live Fraser fir tree a few days after Thanksgiving.  Shortly after getting it in the house and decorated, we realized that the tree wasn’t taking up water.  Panic set in as I recalled what is now referred to as The Tree Fiasco of 2007 when my tree was dead as a doornail 2 weeks before Christmas.  I am talking flammable.

Eclectic Christmas Beach House

I couldn’t live through replacing a dried out, dead tree again so we had to act fast.  At this point, there were just a few dry needles on the decorated tree.   I knew it could be revived.  This is the point where we actually trimmed the tree.  I held it up out of the stand while Ryan gave the trunk a fresh-cut.

Dried Hydrangea on the Christmas Tree

Crisis averted.  All is calm, all is bright.

Eclectic Christmas Beach House

Would you believe that not a single ornament moved during this swift surgery?  A Christmas miracle.

Eclectic Christmas Beach House

I committed to a natural, slightly crafty and  definitely busy look this season in our living room.  I haven’t bought any new Christmas decorations and have yet to regret it.  We had burlap, peacock feathers and moss-covered seed pods leftover from our wedding.  Up on the tree they went.

Dried Seed Pod on the Christmas Tree

We live on a wooded lot now so I was able to collect fresh holly and cedar for the mantel right in our backyard.

Eclectic Christmas Beach House

Plus twigs and dried hydrangeas for the tree.

Citrus Garland on the Christmas Tree

Following suit with the natural decor, I checked my fruit bowl.  I bought 2 large bags of grapefruit a few weeks ago.  After we packed in as much vitamin C as possible, we were left with six grapefruit staring back at us.

Grapefruit to Garland

A wonderful opportunity to try my hand at a citrus garland with the leftovers.  I am so glad I did because they quickly became a staple of our holiday decor this year!

Citrus Garland on the Christmas Tree

First prepare the grapefruit…

  • Pre-heat the oven to 200 degrees
  • Slice up the grapefruits or oranges. Each one will yield 5-6  1/4 inch slices
  • Pat them dry with a paper towel and place on a non-stick cookie sheet
  • Lightly bake for 3-4 hours, flipping the slices halfway

Grapefruit to Garland

Next, make your garland…

  • Choose 1/2 inch-1 inch wide ribbon, twine or fabric as the base of the garland.  I chose to cut up an old flannel shirt, of course (keeping with our Lumberjack holiday theme)
  • Cut into approximately 12 inch long strips.  You will need one strip per piece of citrus
  • Tie each strip of fabric through the citrus.  Most slices will naturally have a whole in the middle
  • Then tie each piece of fabric together creating a little bow at the connection

DIY Dried Citrus Garland

The citrus garland adds a festive illumination to the lit tree.

DIY dried citrus garland

Garland your tree, mantel, foyer, whatever!  Just don’t worry about spending an exorbitant amount of money.  Re-work what you already have in your house…even if it’s edible.

Eclectic Christmas Beach House

What are you making this holiday season?