twinning on a budget

Remember the beach cottage that we’ve slowly but surely been putting our mark on?

twin beach bedroom on a budget

Today I’m sharing the kids space.  It is a very simple white box that we filled in with a loose red & blue color scheme.  I have to admit that this isn’t one of those spaces that is going to knock your socks off with ingenuity or a great before and after.  However, it is totally functional and well received by its little guests.

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I can assure that there is not a new piece in sight aside from the bedding, some of it anyway.  Everything else was found, free or flea.  Very easy on the pockets.  The matching quilts are vintage and possibly my favorite find in the entire space.  I always pick favorites.  I found these at a Navajo estate last summer and just knew they were right for the space.

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Who remembers This End Up from the ’80s and ’90s?  These beds were bunked in my brothers’ childhood room and fortunately I come from a long line of hoarders so these solid wood beds are still going strong over 25 years later, ready for the next generation.  The simple twin beds have classic lines that remind me of summer camp.

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The dresser was another shabby vintage piece which I intended to paint but once we moved it into the space, the rusty-red color just worked with the quilts and the warm wood.  Easy peasy.

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The mirror brings a bit of beach cottage flavor to the space along with the adjacent oar wall.  We originally planned for a standing closet here, specifically vintage blue lockers.  As the space evolved and we saw how it was being utilized we found that we didn’t need to take up square footage with a closet.  No one is staying in there long-term so oar hooks do the trick for the wanderluster.

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Across the room, our little visitors can pull up a chair and page through a book or do a craft while they’re here.  Our bigger visitors can use the small table between the beds as a nightstand.  We’re versatile like that.

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The cedar storage chest at the end of the bed is not permanent in this space. In fact, it sold shortly after I took these pictures.  It was painted MMSMP farmhouse white and was just the right storage piece for toys or bedding at the foot of a twin bed.  I think we’ll need to duplicate this look in the future because it worked well here.

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We hung some simple thrifted, waffle texture curtains although I’m really on the fence with the length.  I don’t want floor length in this room because of the little ones but this particular length feels like a bad tea length dress.  It is just cutting the room’s height mid-calf.  You know what I mean?  I’ll let that evolve though, as I’m sure I’ll know the right textile when I see it, along with the art as I have a vision of more beachy/nautical pieces above the length of the beds.

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That’s it! Welcome to the kids room at the cottage.

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beach cottage bedroom

vintage salvage style beach cottage bedroom

Is it spring yet?  The beach sure is lonely without you.  I am counting down the days until the neighborhood is bustling again.  As much as a I love a little wintertime solitude, I prefer the action that warm sunny weather brings to the sandy beaches.  With that said, let’s check out a bright and cheerful beach cottage bedroom.  Between starfish and vintage swimsuit art, it is just brimming with anticipation of summer!

vintage salvage style beach cottage bedroom

If you are a regular around here, you probably remember that my folks bought a cute beach cottage about a year ago.  We’ve been gradually making progress room by room.  Each space was basically a neutral space that needed a punch of color and personality.  The carpet is brand new so it wasn’t going.  They also weren’t into painting as it was also recently done.  The reality is that other time-consuming projects, like creating a bathroom, took priority.  Basically we just pulled together a color palette and accessorized on a budget.  To do that, we used a combination of salvaged pieces, vintage, second-hand finds plus new textiles and art.  The color scheme is just so happy.  Perfect for the beach, right?

vintage salvage style beach cottage bedroom 393

Once upon a time, the headboard was in my bedroom.  It’s a salvaged door which so happens to measure a short 60 inches – the same width as a queen bed.  Years ago, I adorned it with driftwood, paint and starfish which are still fun.

Possibly my favorite part of the room are the swimsuit prints.  These were very hard to find!  We spotted them about a year ago at Bed, Bath & Beyond but were not ready to pull the trigger.  Of course that was a mistake.  Months later when we ready for art and agreed on the swimsuit prints, they were gone of course.  Local stores were wiped out.  Spoiler alert, after weeks of searching, I finally found them AND they were half price.  Naturally, I also hoarded a set for myself because you never know when you’ll need vintage-inspired swimsuit art.  These were the only two patterns available out of the original six or eight prints.  Fortunately, the colors were perfect.

beach cottage bedside tables + vintage swimsuit art

Those lamps are new-ish but found second-hand for mere dollars.  Aren’t they perfect?  The end tables are both painted in MMS milk paint, apron strings on the left & kitchen scale on the right.  The kitchen scale drum table doesn’t actually belong in this room.  It is one of a pair which are available for sale at West End Garage.  Normally we have a coordinating chest on the right but this one looks pretty darn good there.

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Let me divert your attention to the other side of the room.  What was once two dusty old closets, is now a full bathroom.  It is the tiniest full bathroom aptly named The Water Closet.

The Water Closet-

The closet space was the selling point on this old house but not for storing clothes.  The house had all the space they were looking for in a beach cottage but just one bathroom which was a deal breaker.  We stood in this very room when I had the bright idea that the side-by-side closets from adjacent bedrooms could be knocked out to make room for approximately a 30 square foot bathroom.

WC before

Now, I can’t take all of the credit.  My dad is the plumber who masterminded the water closet complete with a pocket door.  I will take credit for the pocket door actually.  That was my idea.

pocket door water closet bathroom

To the left is the toilet and to the right is a shower stall.

water closet tiny full bathroom

Admittedly two closets were lost in the making of this full bathroom.  However, we compensated with stand alone closets in each room.  As it turns out an additional bathroom is strongly preferred over closet space in a beach house anyway.

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Just three months until Memorial Day!

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Source List

Bedroom

  • Bedding – Homegoods
  • Headboard – salvage
  • Tin Shelf – salvage
  • Night stands – vintage painted in MMSMP Apron Strings & Kitchen Scale
  • Lamps – estate sale finds
  • Curtains – thrifted
  • Top down shades – JCPenney
  • Swimsuit prints – Bed, Bath & Beyond (sold out)
  • Cedar Closet – vintage painted in MMSMP Artissimo

Water Closet

  • Towels – Homegoods
  • Shower Curtain – Homegoods
  • Tile – Home Depot ‘Noce’
  • Mirror – vintage
  • Rattan shelf – trash (no shame)
  • Rattan baskets – Homegoods
  • Plumbing – Marston Mechanical

 

 

 

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touring a turquoise cottage

Last month’s cover of Philadelphia magazine left me grinning.  The editors read my mind.  It has essentially been my goal to get everyone I know from Philly to become my neighbor here, “down the shore”, even if just seasonally.

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In the past year, we’ve successfully converted two couples.  As you know, we’re working on my parents weekend cottage but you probably didn’t know that our friends, Marsha & Steven, also purchased a home here.  I originally met Marsha when we were neighbors at multiple Clover Markets.  Since then, they’ve become real neighbors!

beach cottage living room

They spent last fall and winter turning the fixer upper into an inviting retreat where they can relax and pursue their crafts. It is no surprise that they were able to transform this house into a home so quickly. Marsha had a successful career as an interior decorator for over twenty years.

beach cottage china closet

Since retiring, she paints, gardens and makes mixed-media jewelry that she sells on Etsy and at local markets. Their beach house is complete with a studio brimming with vintage materials for her jewelry line.

The home has been updated from floor to ceiling with fresh paint, new flooring and carpet. Collections of shells and sea glass hued bottles line the shelves as if they were always there. The couple furnished the house with a mix of antiques that they’ve owned for years and new vintage-style pieces that blend seamlessly with the old. As Marsha said, “If you stay with the things you love, they’ll never go out of style.”

I love nothing more than to be invited in to tour someone’s home.  To peruse the layout, the architecture, the way they use color, mix patterns and especially their “finds”.  It’s so inspiring!

beach cottage living room  beach cottage sea glass hues

wood stove & surround

shells

 

 

 

diy capiz shell chandelier

Back to the bathroom renovation posts…  I last left you with how we transformed the dresser into a functioning bathroom vanity.  Today is all about how we DIY’d that glowing goddess of a chandelier.

DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

I’m so in love with it!  We were always destined to have a chandelier in this bathroom.  That was a known fact from early on.  I was originally scouting antique chandeliers.  The reoccurring problem was the size and proportion of a true chandelier to this room which is very important to take into consideration when choosing a light fixture for any room.  I noticed capiz chandeliers pop up a few times on pinterest.  The wheels started turning. This, I thought, we could do on our own on a smaller scale and small budget.

First of all, what are capiz shells?  Turns out they’re oysters.  And not only popular on pinterest but in beach towns too.  I found a couple of these wind chimes at a local gift shop for 10 bucks each.  Score!

DIY capiz shell chandelier

DIY capiz shell chandelier

Need a closer look?  They’re funny.  Not my style, as is.

DIY capiz shell chandelier

I dismantled the shells so they could be re-worked into our light fixture.  These were absolutely priceless for this DIY because they already had the small hole punched through the delicate shell.  Perfect for stringing the fixture together.

  DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

Behind the depths of the radiator vent sits the original oh-so-important bathroom fan.  It is quite nondescript, builder basic like this one sold at Lowe’s.  Once the plastic cover is removed, a world of possibilities awaits.

DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

In our case, it was the replacing the cover with a salvaged heating vent.  So much more interesting!  Rather than having a bulb recessed into the ceiling as intended, Ryan wired a single pendant light bulb into the receptacle and mounted the cast iron vent to the ceiling.  At that point I laid out a design for the shells using painters tape.

DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

Each shell was strung on fishing wire using a series of half hitch knots.

DIY capiz shell chandelier

We started with a length of 3 shells for the center portion of the light.  The next layer is a length of 2 shells and then the perimeter layer is just a single large shell.    They were all tied directly to the vent creating a subtle graduated look.  The fishing line pretty much disappears into the ceiling so the focus remains on the shells.

DIY Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

The fixture casts a nice warm glow when it’s on and of course the fan is fully functioning as well.  I am still on the hunt for sconce lighting by the mirror.  I’ll know it when I find it…maybe this weekend.  It seems to be hunting weather.  Stay tuned!

DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

This is a fun, custom addition for under $30 and about an hour of work.  A relatively easy DIY.

Cottage Style Bathroom

my fleet

After my last post about my new to me vintage ship captain lamp, I got to thinking…

milk paint table makeover & ship captain lamp

Exactly how many of these guys are living in our home?

Well I’m here today to inventory them and introduce you to all of the ship captains/fishermen and their kin!  Without further adieu, my latest collection…

Adjacent to the wall with the lamp is the art deco mantel which is currently home to twin ship captains.

vintage ship captain bookends

They’re pretty cute and functional bookends.

vintage ship captain bookends (2 of 2)

You may remember Old Man Ryan, the vintage needlepoint on the left.  I introduced him a few months ago.

vintage ship captain collection

He has since found a wife and I must say she’s a real looker.  Another vintage needlepoint to his right.

vintage ship captain collection

The little sailor paint by number boy finally found a home.  He seemed to round out the family nicely.  Let’s call him Wilson.

vintage ship captain collection

I told you I have a thing for the peg leg captains.  I like them better than the Gorton’s Fishermen types.

vintage ship captain collection (6 of 7)

We picked up this little figurine in Brimfield.  He’s now perched on a shelf in our bedroom.

vintage ship captain collection

With that said, I do have a Gorton’s Fishermen captain.  He is a painting that is now hanging above our bar area.  I will have to take an updated picture of that soon.  This photo is from when we first got him last summer.  I love the colors of that ocean.

Gorton's Fisherman

The peg leg lamp is definitely my current favorite though.  While all of the captains/fishermen have their own style, I think his is the best.  I love how the yellow mock turtle neck slim his figure down!  Ha!

milk paint table makeover & ship captain lamp

In your opinion, how many is too many in this sort of collection?  I think I’m at capacity.

So tell me, what (or who) are you collecting these days?

another mantel to scape

Yes, you heard right.  There is another mantel in my life.  No, I’m not cheating on my first mantel.

art deco coastal mantel

I firmly believe you can never have too many mantels.  And you don’t need a fireplace to go with said mantel.  A really great mantel will add character and speak for itself.  Like this art deco one that I alluded to on Monday.  Check out the lines.  And the subtly distressed wood.  Love the imperfections.

art deco coastal mantel

As promised, beside the mantel sits my new favorite mid-century tweed swivel chair with brass tips.  And a box of driftwood for good measure.

mid-century tweed swivel chair

This vintage/coastal vignette is the new focal point of our beach house living room.  As our home should, it feels like the perfect mix of both Ryan and me.

vintage coastal living room/mantel vignette

This room is large in scale and was in dire need of further updating to get to this point.

Here’s the back story and before shot.

I’ll be honest, I had a mini-bridezilla moment a few months ago when I realized Ryan would be getting ready here for our wedding which means photographers would be set up in THIS ROOM!  It wasn’t ready!  This is what the furnished space originally looked like when we moved in 3 years ago…

living room before

It is like a time warp of someone’s grandmother’s house in 1992.  I began tearing down the thick vinyl wallpaper about 2 days in.  I couldn’t take it.  We did however embrace all of the wood trim.  I know most people would have walked in and painted everything white and called it a beach cottage.  We are going for a “rustic boathouse” look in this bungalow hence natural woods, brass, blues & greens.

D for drywall & dana

After removing the wallpaper, we painted (and discovered a hidden D!).  I believe the blue we chose is called January Frost by Valspar.

painting

And from there, we just moved those hideous couches back in their places and went to the beach for the next couple of years I suppose.  Slowly the side tables and things got changed out but the couches stuck around for far too long.  Ryan tried to convince me that they were vintage but they weren’t what I had in mind and we both agreed that they were very uncomfortable.  Last fall we found a comfy sectional for the space and then things really started to evolve around it.

coastal cottage living room

A lantern turned lamp with a modern shade got added to the mix.

vintage lantern turned lamp

Green shutters from Phantastic Phinds flank either side of the window.  There are lots of aqua touches throughout the room.  I will share the other half of the space in the near future.

art deco beach house mantel

I found this cage 2 summers ago and turned it into a coffee table with casters and a piece of glass.  It houses an anchor and other rotating coastal treasures.

vintage cage turned coffee table

Let’s get back to the mantel though.  The inaugural coastal mantelscape is a bit monochromatic.  I already have some plans to brighten it up for spring but let’s review…

vintage ship wheel

I found that large picture at a consignment shop a few years back.  It is actually a woodburning of a lighthouse scene.

lighthouse woodburning

The vintage bookends are new to us.  We seem to be collecting ship captains around here like our Gorton’s Fisherman painting that now hangs across the room.  And the old man Ryan needlepoint.  I love them all!

fisherman bookends

But doesn’t it look like this captain is wearing lipstick?  Hey, whatever floats your boat! Ha, get it? Boat.  Captain.  Ok…

ship captain bookend

That wraps up where we are with this space at the moment.  More to come I’m sure!  I am already looking for an updated lamp shade for the ship wheel sconce on the left that I purchased from another vendor at West End Garage.

art deco coastal mantel

What’s currently on your mantel?

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where’d we leave off

Oh right about here.  The beach and the lobster.

Lobster Collage

We harvested this great big weathered board from the beach.  It is almost the same size as me!  Not so much width, but height-wise.

weathered DIY Lobster sign

Once sun bleached and dried out, I chalked on Lobster lettering and a shadow.  Then I filled in with red and white paint.  The red was a custom mix I had left over from the fall sunflower seed sign.  The white is Old White chalk paint by Annie Sloan.

weathered DIY Lobster sign

There were gray paint remnants from its former life which played perfectly into creating the distressed look I was going for.

vintage demijohn

Once the paint dried, I took a palm sander over the lettering to complete the aging process.  I finished up with some clear wax and a bit of ebony stain in some places all in the name of creating an authentically aged look.

The funny thing is that I am constantly trying reverse the aging process on my face yet I continue to force the aging process in my work.  Just an observation.  Hmm.

vintage coastal lantern and minnow bait bucket

Anywho, I wrapped up with a little coastal mantelscaping to coordinate with the new-old Lobster sign.  Everything pictured here is for sale at West End Garage.  A bit summery, isn’t it?  Oh well.  I think I’m ready for sunny, warm days.

weathered DIY Lobster sign and vintage coastal mantel

I also put together a vintage inspired Eggs sign for one’s kitchen.  This is miniscule compared to the mammoth Lobster.  Ryan likes to read “My our Fresh Eggs” but I hope you see otherwise.  “Try our Fresh Eggs”.

eggs sign painted on old cutting board

I used a little old cutting board for the canvas.  I love how the side of the board is trimmed in faded red paint.  After the paint dried, I also clear waxed and wiped on quite a bit of ebony stain particularly near the edges and also to highlight the old cuts in the board.

eggs sign painted on old cutting board

I’m having a moment with cutting boards.  I think I’d like to start a collection.  (Yes another collection.)  Primarily old bread boards in that sweet paddle shape.  Yeah, I need some of those in my life.

What projects are you working on these days?

fading fast

I can feel it in the air.  The subtle cool breeze.  The hint that autumn is around the corner.  Eek!  I’m so excited.  I just love the change of seasons.  And if you know me well, you know that I tend to push that change a little too early.  Mums in late August and pumpkin decor on Labor Day are just a few of my telltale habits.  But don’t fret my friends, I’ve decided to really soak up these fading days of summer this year.  Would you believe I even had an impromptu mini beach project and photoshoot?

True story.  This time last year I was dusting off the pumpkins and planting mums but not this time.  I gave the sea shells one last run for their money.

And the starfish…well they can stay out all year as far as I’m concerned.

But the project at hand was transforming a paddle into something a little more sophisticated.  I picked this guy up with some broken old peg hooks.  Sorry I didn’t take a before pic but I pulled those pegs off so quickly to make way for some glamorous drawer knobs.  The glass one is vintage, the clay one is handmade and the coral one is from Anthropologie.  They make a stunning set, don’t you think?

A perfectly unique decoration for organizing all of your vintage necklaces, scarves or whatever comes to mind.  Of course this could be used in a kid’s room as well but the coral colors just scream lady’s lounge!

I also want to send a big welcome out to all of the new visitors who are stopping by from my feature on WordPress’s Freshly Pressed.  I hope you’ll stay awhile and like what you see!

What summery things are you squeezing in before Labor Day?

triple play

I’ve got not one, not two, but three before & afters for you today.  Thank me later, friends.

Let’s start with this little repurposed wall hook.  It started out as salvaged, old 5-panel door cut into sections. 

One section was painted Duck Egg Blue with a contrasting Emperors Silk accent. This is what using a lot of dark wax looks like.

Then an old wooden door knob was attached to make for a unique hook.  The Welcome text finishes it off!

This chair has been floating around my garage for nearly a year. It was finally up for a makeover.

The chair originally had a caned seat but that was long gone and this wooden one was in its place.  I rolled with the new-to-it seat but gave it a light coat of ASCP Cream and new upholstery tacks.  The rest of the chair was painted in Arles with dark wax all over.

And finally I’ve got a little pine accent table for you.  It used to look like this.  Ho-hum.

Just one coat of Emperors Silk allows for the grain of the wood to show through and dark wax accents the grain even further.

Right away I envisioned a nautical compass on top.  I painted it on in Arles and distressed it giving a crackled look.

There you have it.  Three before and afters to take you into the weekend.

Enjoy!

Linking to: Restore Interiors, Primitive & Proper, Domestically Speaking, Primp, Miss Mustard Seed