Cape May magazine

The spring edition of Cape May magazine is now available.  Aside from featuring everything we love about this town, the regional magazine also offers a regular decorating column called Interior Motives.  Earlier this season, I was asked to contribute to the current column’s theme of refreshing the bathroom.

Bathrooms?  I can talk bathrooms!

Bathroom task lights turned sconces-6339

I met with the editor and we discussed redecorating the bathroom for the upcoming season using new paint, fixtures and accessories.  Naturally I didn’t stray far from the themes of repurposing and styling with vintage.  The cottage bathroom that we completed last year in our home was mentioned in the article (as well as one we’re currently working on using that pretty brass fixture).

Bathroom task lights turned sconces-6344

Here’s how that cottage bathroom looks today with the addition of sconce lighting that we recently added over the sink.  For months I was on the hunt for just the right vanity light fixture.  Then, at the flea market, I came across a pair of gooseneck, task lamps.  Thinking outside of the box, it was clear to me that these lights could be the finishing touch that we needed in this bathroom.  Insert light bulb pun here.

Bathroom task lights turned sconces-6328

Ryan worked his magic dismantling and reconfiguring these task lights into sconces.  He took off the switches and exterior cord and hardwired them to work on the light switch.  We also sprayed them glossy heat-resistant white.

And voila, a custom vanity light for our bathroom.  I like how the lights have a gallery vibe to them as if they’re illuminating the heirloom mirror like a piece of fine art.  If you’re curious, you can see how we constructed the vanity out of a dresser here.

Bathroom task lights turned sconces-6332

The magazine article also references ways to use Miss Mustard Seed’s Milk Paint in the bathroom. We talked about using tough coat as a protective top coat to preserve wood surfaces around water and humidity such as the mirror.

Check out the magazine next time you’re in Cape May.  You can always purchase online too.

yes, that’s a light

Last week I shared some updates regarding vintage in the kitchen.  We didn’t stop at the furniture and accessories but took it to the lighting too.

flea market style kitchen

The funnel-like object over the dining table started the recycled lighting movement in the kitchen.  This piece has been lighting our meals for over a year now.  I still love its quirk and charm.  And we still have no idea as to what it could have possibly been in a former life.  We assume it belonged on a farm but have no idea.  The mystery continues.  I love to hear guesses.

vintage SERVE letters

Ryan installed a new light where one didn’t exist.  This is essentially a foyer area where the door opens into the room.  We needed lighting to define the space.  We found this galvanized piece at an antique store and both instantly thought “light”.  I know, it’s as if a light went off!  Anyway, it appears to be the top of a cupola and that’s exactly how it was found.  Ryan wired it to serve as a pendant in this space.

cuppola top turned pendant light

Across the room, we replaced the light above the sink.  I love this beautiful rusty structure.  This is a wind turbine/air vent that more than likely came from a barn or commercial building.  It is large and in charge.  Light peeks out of all of the openings casting pretty shadows on the ceiling at night.

wind turbine air vent turned light fixture

Just for fun, the before pictures…

There are still a number of updates and DIY projects to go in this room like making use of the pesky space above the cabinets and replacing the hood.  In the meantime, we’re enjoying the vintage aspects so much more than the dated builder grade choices.  It is fun to push the envelope.  Why not?

wind turbine air vent turned light fixture

More out of the ordinary kitchen projects:

upcycled lighting

Hey guys! I’m still in the spirit of Earth Day/Week here so I’d like to share how we turned this galvanized piece of junk into a one of a kind chandelier in our dining nook. And of course, I do mean junque.

Flea Market Style Industrial Galvanized Light Chandelier

The question still remains: What the heck is it?

Galvanized Light

We really don’t know but it seems like some sort of farm machinery.  Someone suggested that it may be for cotton picking.  I have no idea.  Do you?  It’s probably for manure…

It was not originally a funnel.  Ryan cut the hole to replicate a funnel so we could wire the light fixture through.

galvanized light

Galvanized Pendant Chandelier Light

This light transformation was easier than you might think because we had all of the parts already.  Do you remember the kitchen from when we first moved in?  Check out that 80’s light fixture.

kitchen before

Look a little closer because the innards for it are what made up our new light.

before

Breakfast Nook

We carefully took it apart saving all of the pieces.  A few tweaks were made to the innards – new light sleeves plus I sprayed the old shiny brass antique white and hemp oiled the wood.

making a light

Ryan wired the light using our new-to-us “shade” with all of the old light’s parts.  We also switched out the gold chain for a reasonably rusty galvanized chain to complete the look.

Breakfast Nook

We love turning random objects into lights and shades.  Here are a few of other favorites from the archives…

Galvanized Funnel Pendant Lights Galvanized Funnel Lights-3206

Mason Jar Pendant

Mason Jar Pendant

 Vintage Birdcage Light

Vintage Birdcage Light

Shell Fan/Chandelier

Shell Bathroom Fan/Chandelier

What have you upcycled or repurposed lately?

diy capiz shell chandelier

Back to the bathroom renovation posts…  I last left you with how we transformed the dresser into a functioning bathroom vanity.  Today is all about how we DIY’d that glowing goddess of a chandelier.

DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

I’m so in love with it!  We were always destined to have a chandelier in this bathroom.  That was a known fact from early on.  I was originally scouting antique chandeliers.  The reoccurring problem was the size and proportion of a true chandelier to this room which is very important to take into consideration when choosing a light fixture for any room.  I noticed capiz chandeliers pop up a few times on pinterest.  The wheels started turning. This, I thought, we could do on our own on a smaller scale and small budget.

First of all, what are capiz shells?  Turns out they’re oysters.  And not only popular on pinterest but in beach towns too.  I found a couple of these wind chimes at a local gift shop for 10 bucks each.  Score!

DIY capiz shell chandelier

DIY capiz shell chandelier

Need a closer look?  They’re funny.  Not my style, as is.

DIY capiz shell chandelier

I dismantled the shells so they could be re-worked into our light fixture.  These were absolutely priceless for this DIY because they already had the small hole punched through the delicate shell.  Perfect for stringing the fixture together.

  DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

Behind the depths of the radiator vent sits the original oh-so-important bathroom fan.  It is quite nondescript, builder basic like this one sold at Lowe’s.  Once the plastic cover is removed, a world of possibilities awaits.

DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

In our case, it was the replacing the cover with a salvaged heating vent.  So much more interesting!  Rather than having a bulb recessed into the ceiling as intended, Ryan wired a single pendant light bulb into the receptacle and mounted the cast iron vent to the ceiling.  At that point I laid out a design for the shells using painters tape.

DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

Each shell was strung on fishing wire using a series of half hitch knots.

DIY capiz shell chandelier

We started with a length of 3 shells for the center portion of the light.  The next layer is a length of 2 shells and then the perimeter layer is just a single large shell.    They were all tied directly to the vent creating a subtle graduated look.  The fishing line pretty much disappears into the ceiling so the focus remains on the shells.

DIY Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

The fixture casts a nice warm glow when it’s on and of course the fan is fully functioning as well.  I am still on the hunt for sconce lighting by the mirror.  I’ll know it when I find it…maybe this weekend.  It seems to be hunting weather.  Stay tuned!

DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

This is a fun, custom addition for under $30 and about an hour of work.  A relatively easy DIY.

Cottage Style Bathroom