thoughts on pink

Sometimes pink is just that. Feminine, girly, frilly.  Pink!

arabesque french dresser-275

But sometimes it can be quiet, subtle and almost neutral.  I don’t dare say masculine because we are programmed to believe that pink is the opposite of masculine but perhaps in a room full of dark wood or ornate antiques it can balance out the masculinity.

salvaged baluster lamps arabesque french dresser-273

I’d like to think that the less-than-precious finish on this French provincial piece can lend to a variety of settings from the obvious choice in a little girl’s bedroom to a dining room sideboard stand-in or and entryway piece.  The latter is how I would choose to use it.

arabesque french dresser-278

The body is painted in MMSMP Arabesque while the eight drawers are layered in Marzipan which is a warm neutral in and of itself.  Between the layers of Marzipan is antiquing wax and light distressing for an imperfect finish.

arabesque french dresser-292

The body of the dresser chipped on its own revealing hints of brown.  After some subtle white waxing on the pink, the entire piece received a top coat of MMSMP Tough Coat for durability.

shells - arabesque french dresser-283

The inside of the drawers is undeniably feminine with a surprise pop of vintage floral wallpaper!  The original hardware is on six of the eight drawers with a hint of gilding wax to bring out the detail.  The smaller top drawers received a knob since one pull overall was missing when we found this dresser.  Since taking these photos I’ve since switched out the pink knobs for brass ones.

vintage wallpaper as draawer liner - arabesque french dresser-287

Here is how it looks staged for sale at The West End Garage.  I love that original tin wall.  I’m sure I’ve mentioned that before!  It is funny how Arabesque sometimes reads as a lilac and less pink.

WEG arabesque dresser

Also, did you see those lamps?  Another set of salvaged baluster lamps created by Ryan.  This pair is also less than precious with chipping paint and fractures adding to the awesomeness!

salvaged baluster lamp

I am not sure that I ever shared on the blog the pair of green salvaged baluster lamps that Ryan made.  These sold some time ago but were another favorite!  We opted to make the white pair a little bit more industrial with the hardware exposed since the top is where most of the detail of the white balusters lie.  Otherwise the lampshades would have covered those curves.

green salvage baluster lamps-096

And speaking of pink, here is a pink baluster lamp that Ryan made and we’ve decided to keep for our own living room.

pink salvage baluster lamp-159

Tell me your thoughts on pink.  Is it feminine all of the time?  Neutral?  Can it go masculine?

driftwood lamps

What’s old is new again!
Driftwood Lamp Collection 3

A battered piece of driftwood crafted into a sculptural one-of-a-kind lamp is feeling very current with a nod to the late 60’s/early 70’s.  I’m digging how these are coastal with a dose of industrial due to a hint exposed brass-tone hardware.

Driftwood Lamp Collection-7300

In fact, driftwood lamps can go in so many design directions.  Obviously the organic pieces have a nautical feel.  Perhaps less obvious is that the sculptural aspect lends itself to a modern or mid-century modern design as well.

Driftwood Lamp Collection-7324

The lamps can also be the statement piece in an otherwise traditional room.  Lastly, let’s not leave out the boho style that is trending hard right now.  Mixing driftwood with layers of pattern gives your eye a place to rest in bohemian design aesthetic.

Driftwood Lamp Collection-7309

All of the credit on the driftwood lamp collection goes to Ryan, my partner in crime & design.  He conceptualized, designed and wired each piece.  I think he did a phenomenal job.  They’re all for sale although we’re sad to part with them.  That’s typical here, though.  We can’t keep them all!

Cape May magazine

The spring edition of Cape May magazine is now available.  Aside from featuring everything we love about this town, the regional magazine also offers a regular decorating column called Interior Motives.  Earlier this season, I was asked to contribute to the current column’s theme of refreshing the bathroom.

Bathrooms?  I can talk bathrooms!

Bathroom task lights turned sconces-6339

I met with the editor and we discussed redecorating the bathroom for the upcoming season using new paint, fixtures and accessories.  Naturally I didn’t stray far from the themes of repurposing and styling with vintage.  The cottage bathroom that we completed last year in our home was mentioned in the article (as well as one we’re currently working on using that pretty brass fixture).

Bathroom task lights turned sconces-6344

Here’s how that cottage bathroom looks today with the addition of sconce lighting that we recently added over the sink.  For months I was on the hunt for just the right vanity light fixture.  Then, at the flea market, I came across a pair of gooseneck, task lamps.  Thinking outside of the box, it was clear to me that these lights could be the finishing touch that we needed in this bathroom.  Insert light bulb pun here.

Bathroom task lights turned sconces-6328

Ryan worked his magic dismantling and reconfiguring these task lights into sconces.  He took off the switches and exterior cord and hardwired them to work on the light switch.  We also sprayed them glossy heat-resistant white.

And voila, a custom vanity light for our bathroom.  I like how the lights have a gallery vibe to them as if they’re illuminating the heirloom mirror like a piece of fine art.  If you’re curious, you can see how we constructed the vanity out of a dresser here.

Bathroom task lights turned sconces-6332

The magazine article also references ways to use Miss Mustard Seed’s Milk Paint in the bathroom. We talked about using tough coat as a protective top coat to preserve wood surfaces around water and humidity such as the mirror.

Check out the magazine next time you’re in Cape May.  You can always purchase online too.

yes, that’s a light

Last week I shared some updates regarding vintage in the kitchen.  We didn’t stop at the furniture and accessories but took it to the lighting too.

flea market style kitchen

The funnel-like object over the dining table started the recycled lighting movement in the kitchen.  This piece has been lighting our meals for over a year now.  I still love its quirk and charm.  And we still have no idea as to what it could have possibly been in a former life.  We assume it belonged on a farm but have no idea.  The mystery continues.  I love to hear guesses.

vintage SERVE letters

Ryan installed a new light where one didn’t exist.  This is essentially a foyer area where the door opens into the room.  We needed lighting to define the space.  We found this galvanized piece at an antique store and both instantly thought “light”.  I know, it’s as if a light went off!  Anyway, it appears to be the top of a cupola and that’s exactly how it was found.  Ryan wired it to serve as a pendant in this space.

cuppola top turned pendant light

Across the room, we replaced the light above the sink.  I love this beautiful rusty structure.  This is a wind turbine/air vent that more than likely came from a barn or commercial building.  It is large and in charge.  Light peeks out of all of the openings casting pretty shadows on the ceiling at night.

wind turbine air vent turned light fixture

Just for fun, the before pictures…

There are still a number of updates and DIY projects to go in this room like making use of the pesky space above the cabinets and replacing the hood.  In the meantime, we’re enjoying the vintage aspects so much more than the dated builder grade choices.  It is fun to push the envelope.  Why not?

wind turbine air vent turned light fixture

More out of the ordinary kitchen projects:

upcycled lighting

Hey guys! I’m still in the spirit of Earth Day/Week here so I’d like to share how we turned this galvanized piece of junk into a one of a kind chandelier in our dining nook. And of course, I do mean junque.

Flea Market Style Industrial Galvanized Light Chandelier

The question still remains: What the heck is it?

Galvanized Light

We really don’t know but it seems like some sort of farm machinery.  Someone suggested that it may be for cotton picking.  I have no idea.  Do you?  It’s probably for manure…

It was not originally a funnel.  Ryan cut the hole to replicate a funnel so we could wire the light fixture through.

galvanized light

Galvanized Pendant Chandelier Light

This light transformation was easier than you might think because we had all of the parts already.  Do you remember the kitchen from when we first moved in?  Check out that 80’s light fixture.

kitchen before

Look a little closer because the innards for it are what made up our new light.

before

Breakfast Nook

We carefully took it apart saving all of the pieces.  A few tweaks were made to the innards – new light sleeves plus I sprayed the old shiny brass antique white and hemp oiled the wood.

making a light

Ryan wired the light using our new-to-us “shade” with all of the old light’s parts.  We also switched out the gold chain for a reasonably rusty galvanized chain to complete the look.

Breakfast Nook

We love turning random objects into lights and shades.  Here are a few of other favorites from the archives…

Galvanized Funnel Pendant Lights Galvanized Funnel Lights-3206

Mason Jar Pendant

Mason Jar Pendant

 Vintage Birdcage Light

Vintage Birdcage Light

Shell Fan/Chandelier

Shell Bathroom Fan/Chandelier

What have you upcycled or repurposed lately?

diy capiz shell chandelier

Back to the bathroom renovation posts…  I last left you with how we transformed the dresser into a functioning bathroom vanity.  Today is all about how we DIY’d that glowing goddess of a chandelier.

DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

I’m so in love with it!  We were always destined to have a chandelier in this bathroom.  That was a known fact from early on.  I was originally scouting antique chandeliers.  The reoccurring problem was the size and proportion of a true chandelier to this room which is very important to take into consideration when choosing a light fixture for any room.  I noticed capiz chandeliers pop up a few times on pinterest.  The wheels started turning. This, I thought, we could do on our own on a smaller scale and small budget.

First of all, what are capiz shells?  Turns out they’re oysters.  And not only popular on pinterest but in beach towns too.  I found a couple of these wind chimes at a local gift shop for 10 bucks each.  Score!

DIY capiz shell chandelier

DIY capiz shell chandelier

Need a closer look?  They’re funny.  Not my style, as is.

DIY capiz shell chandelier

I dismantled the shells so they could be re-worked into our light fixture.  These were absolutely priceless for this DIY because they already had the small hole punched through the delicate shell.  Perfect for stringing the fixture together.

  DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

Behind the depths of the radiator vent sits the original oh-so-important bathroom fan.  It is quite nondescript, builder basic like this one sold at Lowe’s.  Once the plastic cover is removed, a world of possibilities awaits.

DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

In our case, it was the replacing the cover with a salvaged heating vent.  So much more interesting!  Rather than having a bulb recessed into the ceiling as intended, Ryan wired a single pendant light bulb into the receptacle and mounted the cast iron vent to the ceiling.  At that point I laid out a design for the shells using painters tape.

DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

Each shell was strung on fishing wire using a series of half hitch knots.

DIY capiz shell chandelier

We started with a length of 3 shells for the center portion of the light.  The next layer is a length of 2 shells and then the perimeter layer is just a single large shell.    They were all tied directly to the vent creating a subtle graduated look.  The fishing line pretty much disappears into the ceiling so the focus remains on the shells.

DIY Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

The fixture casts a nice warm glow when it’s on and of course the fan is fully functioning as well.  I am still on the hunt for sconce lighting by the mirror.  I’ll know it when I find it…maybe this weekend.  It seems to be hunting weather.  Stay tuned!

DIY Capiz Shell Chandelier and Bathroom Fan

This is a fun, custom addition for under $30 and about an hour of work.  A relatively easy DIY.

Cottage Style Bathroom

ol’ peg leg

I have been wanting to brighten up this neutral corner of our living room for sometime now.  I do love the lantern lamp and just about all of the accessories but not together.  The proportion of the lamp was just wrong and all of that brown was killing me.

IMG_1393

Then this man walked into my life…

vintage ship captain lamp

and everything was suddenly right in this corner.

milk paint table makeover & ship captain lamp

For those of you who follow me on instagram, you know that I fell in love with the peg leg ship captain lamp last weekend.  I spotted him last Friday at the most amazing hoarder sale that I’ve ever been to.  It was completely overwhelming.  So overwhelming that I left on Friday without ol’ Peg Leg.

I was so discontent knowing I left him behind.  I lost sleep over it that night.  The next morning I got up first thing and headed back to the sale thinking my treasure would be long gone.  I was so anxious to find out that I backed into a neighbor’s car pulling out of the driveway.

True story.

I can’t even believe I just admitted to hitting a parked car on the internet.  The mayhem was totally worth it though because when I returned to the sale, the ship captain was still there waiting for me.  All was right in the world!

I took him home with me and let the transformation begin in this little corner.

milk paint table makeover & ship captain lamp

I had been imagining the little oak side table in Mustard Seed Yellow milk paint for quite a while.  The captain influenced me to finally make the change.  He seems to have that power on me.

milk paint table makeover & ship captain lamp

Two coats of milk paint, a topcoat of MMS wax and a good buffing and here’s how the table turned out.  Her curves pop against all of the neutrals.

milk paint table makeover & ship captain lamp (12 of 21)

I’ve been planning to inject more yellow into this space to brighten up all of the browns, blues & greens.  In fact, I think I’m over the blue accent wall but that is a project for another day.  So I pulled some accessories I already had and I’m happy with the results.

milk paint table makeover & ship captain lamp

Ol’ Peg Leg’s lamp shade is new from Target’s Threshold collection.

milk paint table makeover & ship captain lamp

I moved the books to the lower shelf which I gave a dry coat of Eulalie’s Sky, a new milk paint color.  You can barely see the blue but it goes with the books I think.  I also filled this glass apothecary jar of my Grandmother’s with shells for that shelf.

milk paint table makeover & shells

We picked up this brass ship wheel barometer thingy on our honeymoon.  I have no idea how to use but I sure do love it.  Form over function, here.

antque brass barometer

We’ve had the vintage cage turned coffee table for a few years but the hooked rag rug below it is new.

milk paint table makeover & ship captain lamp

After doing a bunch of research on making a rag rug, I found one at Crate & Barrel and registered for it.  My friends got it for me for my shower!  I just love that it is made from recycled fabrics and I’m sure I could have never made one like it.

milk paint table makeover & ship captain lamp

What do you think?  Have you hit any good hoarder sales lately?

Linking to Miss Mustard Seed

the green guy

I’ve been on a kick lately with small chests and night stands. I’ll admit that they’re easy to maneuver and transport without any help and that’s probably why I’m going for them. I love the simple shape of this one with its curved base and original brass pulls. A little TLC and here’s how he looks now…

lucketts green milk paint chest (2 of 30)

A far cry from its chewed up before state.

chest before

But with this piece being solid wood, it had potential.  I sanded the top down to prepare for an ebony stain – my typical stain color of choice.  And filled in any gouges.

chest during

lucketts green milk paint chest (8 of 30)

For the base I used a very light coat of boxwood milk paint which added depth under the second coat of lucketts green milk paint.

lucketts green milk paint chest (18 of 30)

I didn’t use any bonding agent (primer) in my milk paint solution since the wood was very dry to begin with plus got a light sanding.  Therefore the milk paint primarily acted as a stain on this piece.

lucketts green milk paint chest (15 of 30)

I used a top coat of Miss Mustard Seed’s furniture wax and some antiquing wax to add to the aged look.

lucketts green milk paint chest (1 of 30)

I love the original brass pulls that came with this chest however one was incomplete so I had to improvise.  I chose to add 2 aqua & brass Anthropologie knobs on the top drawer.  This gives the otherwise antique style piece a hint of modern.

lucketts green milk paint chest (5 of 30)

Plus I’m a fan of aqua (in case you didn’t know!) and the knobs paired nicely with the vintage globe!

vintage bert doll, mid-century lamp & replogle globe

And Bert he’s just so darn cute, isn’t he?

vintage bert doll & replogle globe

We have a pair of these funky wooden mid-century lamps.  Ryan and I really want to keep them but don’t have a spot for them.  I don’t even hate the original lampshades as I normally do.  Surprisingly no one bought them at Brooklyn Flea Philly last weekend although many considered them.  Maybe it’s a sign.

vintage mid-century lamp

The ship ink & watercolor, Bert and the Replogle (Made in Chicago) globe have all found new homes though.  Like fostering puppies I tell ya…

lucketts green milk paint chest (20 of 30)

I’m pretty happy with the color choices on this chest.  So what do you think, has it inspired you to paint?

Linking to Miss Mustard Seed

got a light

The final day of August is here. Labor day weekend is upon us here in the states! Yay!

Throughout the summer I’ve collected some great vintage lamps. All of which needed some updating to make them new again. Fortunately for me, Ryan rewired them as needed. And I selected modern shades. Can you tell I like a good drum shade? Our house is starting to look like a lighting store as a result.

Let’s take a look at these vintage beauties, shall we?

This midcentury lamp base is a little Jane Jetson meets Betty Draper, don’t ya think?

I love that there is a pair with such great detailing!

I’ve covered so many different eras in this little collection.  Check out this art deco painted glass lamp…ignore the crooked shade.  I love the chippy, green painted base.  When this one came to me, it was just a lamp base.  No wiring or anything.  I’m glad to see her back in action as a lamp.

This cut glass lamp reminds me of a crystal ball.  Perhaps I can see my future in it.  What do you think of the choice to pair it with a linen angular shade?  I thought the shapes were nice contrasts to one another.

And probably my favorite of the group, although a tough choice, is this alabaster lamp.  I have always wanted to be the type of dealer that has an alabaster lamp in stock.  I think alabaster lamps are so sleek and timeless.  I was so happy to find this one!  The color of the shade matches the dark accent in the marble just perfectly.

I guess I can remove the cellophane from the shades now, huh?  So which is your favorite?  Am I little too excited about some updated lamps?

“I love lamp.”  Name that movie.